Website Rebuilding

With as amazing as the computers and the internet are, sometimes things just don’t go as planned. I checked my website (patbertram.com) today to make sure it was still online. I am using a retired website builder as well as a defunct template, and occasionally the people who supply my domain will downgrade the site to a different server, which often causes problems.

The site was still up, but I found a black x at the top of my homepage. I have no idea what had been there originally, so I simply removed the x and hoped for the best. Then I checked out my book page and noticed that several of my book covers had also disappeared.

No problem. I just needed to add them back. Well, I added one photo, but when I tried to resize it to fit in the original slot, I kept getting strange messages. First, it said that flash player is outdated; click here to update. When I clicked, I got another message that said flash player was blocked, but to click to allow flash player one time. So I clicked. Then I got other messages saying, at various times: this page is opened in two windows, we couldn’t save your work, couldn’t update, error, try again, call technical support.

I figured there was some sort of glitch, so I closed out the browser and restarted my computer. Same thing.

After a couple of more tries, I finally gave in and called technical support. His suggestion was to clear my cache, which I did, then I tried again to resize the photo. Still all the same problems and messages.

His next suggestion was to try a different browser. So I downloaded Firefox but had to abort the download because I hadn’t unchecked the boxes that allowed a whole bunch of stuff I don’t want to be downloaded at the same time. When I tried to download again, I couldn’t find where the download had been stored. Sheesh.

Finally, got Firefox downloaded, and tried fixing my website again. This time, when I got the message saying that I needed to update flash player, it updated. But then all the same messages started reappearing, and the photo still didn’t resize.

By this time, the poor tech fellow was as frustrated as I was, but he came up with a different suggestion: to resize the photo and then upload the resized photo. I did that, but since I couldn’t remember what size I needed, I made the photo too big. To my delight, this time the resizing mechanism worked.

The only thing either of us could figure out was that the original photos had somehow become corrupted, because replacing the rest of the photos and resizing them went quickly.

Still, what should have been a five-minute fix ended up being a three-hour chore.

Luckily, I don’t often have to deal with my website. The last time I did a major overhaul was when Grief: The Inside Story — A Guide to Surviving the Loss of a Loved One was published. The next time I will have to do anything major is when my new book is published, hopefully sometime this year.

I paused here to double check to make sure I put the books covers with the correct blurb, and noticed that Grief: The Inside Story is not on the page with all the rest of my books. There is always something, isn’t there? Well, adding the book will just have to wait for another time.

The website is there mostly for convenience, anyway. This blog functions as a website, and is much more interesting, besides. At least, normally it is.

As if that weren’t enough, I hid the favorites tool bar on my browser so I could get a bigger image of the website to post here, and then couldn’t find the tool bar again to unhide it.

I think I’m done for the day.

***

Pat Bertram is the author of Grief: The Inside Story – A Guide to Surviving the Loss of a Loved One. “Grief: The Inside Story is perfect and that is not hyperbole! It is exactly what folk who are grieving need to read.” –Leesa Healy, RN, GDAS GDAT, Emotional/Mental Health Therapist & Educator.

3 Responses to “Website Rebuilding”

  1. Malcolm R. Campbell Says:

    These kinds of messes/glitches drive me nuts.

  2. Carol J. Garvin Says:

    You have my complete sympathy! Over the past twenty years I’ve set up and maintained seven blogs or websites, and there always seems to be a ‘Murphy’s Law’ aspect to deal with. More than once I’ve been heard yelling, “Why can’t it just work like it’s supposed to?” A few years ago our church finally decided it was time to remake the church website and we decided to hire a web designer. Best decision ever!!! Now I just have to maintain it with the new entries and if I run into a problem I can leave it to the web guy to fix. I have to say though, that the blogs and sites based on a WordPress platform have turned out to be the easiest to deal with. I’ve been using a free version for my personal blog/website, but that means there are random ads on it, many not to my taste. I’m thinking of paying for a version that will eliminate them but I’m almost afraid to make a change. I keep hearing, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

    • Pat Bertram Says:

      I felt the same way about my blog, but like you, I find so many of the ads distasteful, so I went with a personal plan that included a domain name and no ads. At the base, the site is still the same with the same original free URL. Only the public page has the new domain name. I am glad I made the change. I didn’t want people to think I actually endorsed some of those products. I don’t think WordPress is an option for my website, but if the site ever makes me change my web builder, I might look into it. I must admit, though, it helps when I get the domain company involved — why should I be the only one tormented by the problems!


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