Righteous Exhaustion

With all the work I’ve been doing to landscape my yard, as well as tracking in dirt into the house via my shoes (even though I leave them at the door, the dirt seems to spread throughout the house), I’d pretty much given up housework as a lost cause. Well, today, that cause ceased to be lost and instead became found. And ai yai yai, what a task!

I hadn’t actually planned to clean the house, but I have been in the habit of doing something physical in the mornings. It was too cold to go outside and sitting down to read so early in the day smacked of wanton idleness, so I decided to get rid of the worst of the dust. Well, one thing led to another, and two hours later, I was still working.

This is a small house, and I have various modern cleaning tools at my disposal, so it shouldn’t have taken me very long, but the place needed a thorough cleaning. Apparently, I stopped seeing the dust on the flat surfaces and building up in the corners. Or more to the point, I didn’t want to see because there was nothing I could do (or wanted to do) about it since I was exhausted from my outside activities.

And now I’m exhausted from inside activities.

To be honest, I think all the digging and planting I’ve been doing were easier than cleaning house. Admittedly, everything is brighter now without dust dulling floors and furniture, but still, it was hard work. Now that most of the outside chores are done — only watering my newly sodded lawn and eventually sowing wildflower seeds remain — I should be able to go back to playing house more frequently rather than working at it as I did today.

Wait . . . I just thought of another outside chore I will have to begin doing as soon as the leaves on the neighbors’ trees are gone — blowing leaves off the ornamental rock around my house and garage. I’m not real anxious to attack that job because I have a feeling not all the leaves will blow off since they didn’t on a trial run, but all I can do is the best I (and my tools) can do. The leaf blower blows hard, so that’s not the problem. In fact, on the high setting, it’s enough to blow the rocks around, but some twigs and leaves still remain.

But that’s not a problem for today. Today I just want to bask in righteous exhaustion and the thought of a job well done.

***

Pat Bertram is the author of Grief: The Inside Story – A Guide to Surviving the Loss of a Loved One. “Grief: The Inside Story is perfect and that is not hyperbole! It is exactly what folk who are grieving need to read.” –Leesa Healy, RN, GDAS GDAT, Emotional/Mental Health Therapist & Educator.

2 Responses to “Righteous Exhaustion”

  1. Carol J. Garvin Says:

    It seems like I do little-to-no real housework anymore. The reality is that my hubby and I don’t seem to make much mess and dirt when we’re here on our own, even with a large dog. There’s weekly vacuuming, and a bit of regular dusting, of course, but I got into the habit of putting things away as I finished with them, tidying things up at the end of each day, and giving one room a week a thorough cleaning, and that seems to keep things presentable. I must admit though, there’s a nagging feeling that I’m getting behind on some of the thoroughness. I blame it on my increasing age; everything takes longer and requires more energy than I sometimes seem to have.

    • Pat Bertram Says:

      Ever since I moved here, I’ve gotten in the habit of putting things away and tidying up at the end of the day, which is so not the way I used to be. Since it’s just me and no dog, there is only one room that really gets dirty, and that’s the utility room (an enclosed porch actually) where I go in and out. Even with door mats inside and out, I end up with a mess.


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